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Catastrophic floods during the last large-scale melting of glaciers shaped the contours of present-day Europe and created natural-climactic preconditions for the territory of modern Ukraine to become populated
15 March, 2013   ▪   Leonid Zalizniak
The Ukrainian press of the early 20th century survived only thanks to a handful of subscribers and funding from selfless donors
22 February, 2013   ▪   Ihor Hyrych
Since its inception, the press has performed an important social mission and undergone a long evolutionary process along the path to freedom of expression
22 February, 2013   ▪   Oleksandr Pahiria
For a large part of the Ukrainian population, Stalin’s “liberation from the Germans” was a mirror image of Hitler’s “liberation of Ukraine from the Bolsheviks” in 1941
8 February, 2013   ▪   Vladyslav Hrynevych
Philippe de Lara: “Totalitarian regimes are dead, but they continue to exert a strong influence on many countries and their cultures”
8 February, 2013   ▪   Hanna Trehub
From the viewpoint of contemporary European ethnology, the people who inhabited Southern Rus' in the 10th through the 13th century A.D. and were governed by the principalities of Kyiv, Pereiaslav and Halych had proto-Ukrainian ethnolinguistic traits
22 January, 2013   ▪   Leonid Zalizniak
The evolution of marriage from forced to voluntary, from church to civil, and from convenience to love
17 December, 2012   ▪   Volodymyr Masliychuk
The union between Bohdan Khmelnytsky and the Tatars, signed in early 1648, was intended to secure significant military successes, but relationships between the parties were far from straitforward
10 December, 2012   ▪   Yaroslav Stolitsky
The formidable talent of Bohdan Khmelnytsky and the helplessness of the Polish troops at the time led to an outstanding Cossack victory in the Battle of Batih
10 December, 2012   ▪   Serhiy Drozd
Some renowned Western intellectuals thought of the Famine as a justified step to the Soviet Union’s radiant future
26 November, 2012   ▪   Bohdan Tsioupine
At one time scattered between the Neman and Western Bug Rivers, the Yotvingians contributed to the development of several Eastern European nations
24 November, 2012   ▪   Kostiantyn Rakhno
The peaceful and military roles women played in the UPA
15 November, 2012   ▪   Lesia Onyshko
Despite its image as an entrenched military-political entity, the UPA included a number of intellectuals and talented artists who remain little known today
14 November, 2012   ▪   Ivan Trokhymenko
4 myths about UPA Fighters
13 November, 2012   ▪   Ivan Patryliak
The sovietization of Western Ukraine in 1939-41 was a triumph of Bolshevik barbarity over the more cultured “liberated” population
12 November, 2012   ▪   Oleksandr Pahiria
The creation of the Ukrainian Orthodox Church (Kyiv Patriarchate) 20 years ago was as resolute a step as proclaiming the independence of the Ukrainian state
8 November, 2012   ▪   Pavlo Podobied
The absence of elementary living conditions and a regular supply system in the UPA was offset by active assistance from the local population
1 November, 2012   ▪   Oleksandr Pahiria
Monopolization, dictated by the imperial economic model, already hurt Ukraine back in the 19th century as clearly evidenced by sugar production, one of its most developed industries at that time
22 October, 2012   ▪   Oleksiy Sokyrko
The activity of communist parties in Europe was not only part of the Kremlin’s foreign policy tactics but also an additional polarising factor in European society
16 October, 2012   ▪   Oleksandr Pahiria
Most flaws of modern Ukrainian cities stem from the soviet construction boom of the 1950s-1970s
26 September, 2012   ▪   Yaroslav Hyrych
Federalization in the absence of a rule-of-law state degrades regions
21 September, 2012   ▪   Ihor Losiev
Having courageously chosen to be Ukrainian, representatives of national minorities essentially activated the Ukrainian national movement of the 19th and early 20th centuries.
19 September, 2012   ▪   Ihor Hyrych
Scattered across the vast Eurasian steppes, throughout their history, the Saka were inseparably linked with the population living north of the Black Sea
17 September, 2012   ▪   Kostiantyn Rakhno
Jerzy Nowosielski as a mediator in Polish-Ukrainian intercultural dialogue
7 September, 2012   ▪   Lukasz Saturczak
The Ukrainian Week offers a series of articles about technological inventions which have changed human history and induced civilizational progress and modernization of the economic, social and cultural landscape. This week’s story tells about trams, the first urban means of transport.
30 August, 2012   ▪   Dmytro Kalynchuk
Several operations against national minorities were carried out alongside class-based persecutions and purges among ranking party members in Ukraine
29 August, 2012   ▪   Roman Podkur
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Social networks went into a rage, the President’s site was bombarded with dozens of petitions, and many began talking about censorship on the internet. The reason for this outburst was a ban on Vkontakte, a Russian version of Facebook very popular among schoolkids, Yandex, Russia’s answer to Google, and Mail.ru in Ukraine
18 May, Stanislav Kozliuk,
The Crimean Tatars faced deportation from the peninsula under Stalin in 1944. Today, they are facing a policy of quiet expulsion from their lands
8 May, Stanislav Kozliuk,
Current state and plans in Ukraine’s defense industry
28 April, Yuriy Lapayev,
What it takes to upgrade Ukraine’s military
28 April, Oleksandr Kramar,
 
 
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