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Last Publications
On March 2, 1919, the Polish government decided to polonize and colonialize Volynhia, as the Volyn region of Ukraine was then known
2 April, Sviatoslav Lypovetsky,
What shaped the aristocratic tradition in politics between the Cossack period and the liberation struggle in 1917-1920
2 March, Yurii Tereshchenko,
Previous Publications
What national policy was like in the USSR
5 October, 2017   ▪   Stanislav Kulchytsky
A historian looks at the crucial cult of the Soviet Union
31 August, 2017   ▪   Stanislav Kulchytsky
The origins of Dnipro, the city and its name
18 August, 2017   ▪   Oleh Repan
How the last Hetman of Ukraine came to power in 1918 and what he achieved
31 March, 2017   ▪   Yurii Tereshchenko
When Nikita Khrushchev came to power, he brought a "Ukrainian clan" with him. It later removed their patron from the helm of the USSR
3 March, 2017   ▪   Valeriy Prymost
The evolution of Ukrainian elite and its state-building concepts offers a valuable lesson to the country today
19 September, 2016   ▪   Yurii Tereshchenko
The 1920s’ Avant-garde school of artists was ultimately destroyed as class enemies—for hooliganism and pornography
23 August, 2016   ▪   Yaryna Tsymbal
The story of a Stalin-era shady businessman
19 July, 2016   ▪   Valeriy Prymost
The authors, the readers and the anti- bourgeois persecutors of romance novels in the 1920s
8 June, 2016   ▪   Yaryna Tsymbal
The capacity of a community to maintain an awareness of the image of its past that brings up strong emotions over a long historical period is what we call national memory. Of course, national memory is no mere projection of the past: it is extraordinarily tightly intertwined with the present and the future of people who are joined through common historical memories
2 June, 2016   ▪   Ihor Losiev
In an attempt to understand what Crimea meant and what it means for Ukraine today, to look at important moments in the history of the peninsula and Crimean Tatars, to define the foundation of Crimean Tatar identity, and to analyze the prospects of Crimea’s return to Ukraine and its position after de-occupation, The Ukrainian Week speaks to historian and political scientist Gulnara Bekirova
18 May, 2016   ▪   Anastasiya Levkova
Russia broke up in 1917, but the Bolsheviks intended to restore the empire – as a springboard to create a "Global Soviet Republic"
5 February, 2016   ▪   Stanislav Kulchytsky
When as a student I heard Arsenal, the jazz rock band of the Kaliningrad Philharmonic, I was dumbfounded: in Soviet times Russian musicians were playing music that jazz lovers at once identified as being under the influence of Chicago and Blood, Sweat and Tear
2 February, 2016   ▪   Leonіdas Donskіs
Most of the crimes against Ukrainians have been at the hands of other Ukrainians. What’s important now is to understand how this phenomenon of the Malorosians or Little Russians happened
11 January, 2016   ▪   Valeriy Prymost
When Ukraine declared independence on August 24, 1991, it not only meant the revival of the Ukrainian state—it was the decisive event in the collapse of the totalitarian soviet empire
23 September, 2015   ▪   Volodymyr Vasylenko
Ways to protect Ukrainian cultural and historical heritage in the annexed Crimea and frontline areas
23 September, 2015   ▪   Hanna Trehub
Former UPA fighter shares his story of struggle against the Nazis and NKVD, GULAGs and return to Ukraine
6 August, 2015   ▪   Volodymyr Panchenko
How Ukrainians have developed tolerance for other religions
23 July, 2015   ▪   Hanna Trehub
Empires are fated to drag along with them a cast iron wreath of invincibility and lead chains of infallibility. An empire can never lose or make a mistake, otherwise, it’s not really an empire
17 June, 2015   ▪   Valeriy Prymost
The beginning and end of World War II brought about political collusions that greatly discredited the leaders of Western democracies
12 May, 2015   ▪   Ihor Losiev
Yelyzaveta Skoropadska in art, politics and charity in some of the most tragic years of Ukrainian history
26 March, 2015   ▪  
Why is Russia so persistently aggressing on Ukraine?
27 February, 2015   ▪   Valeriy Prymost
The rationale behind transferring the peninsula to the Ukrainian SSR in 1954
5 January, 2015   ▪   Serhiy Hromenko
Russia insists that Kharkiv does not belong to Ukraine. Meanwhile, even several waves of Russification failed to make it truly Russian
23 November, 2014   ▪   Svitlana Potapenko
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As other candidates fumble to establish a footing, Yulia Tymoshenko is busy mobilizing resources for a third presidential run
yesterday, Denys Kazanskyi,
Chair of the Seminar of Health Sciences and Health Policy at the University of Lucerne and Director of Swiss Paraplegic Research about why rehabilitation will take a crucial place in modern societies and healthcare, how it helps national economies and how long a healthcare reform takes
yesterday, Anna Korbut,
The "DPR government" has announced its intention to flood the closed Young Communard mine in Yenakiyeve. 40 years ago, nuclear tests were carried out in it, and nobody knows today what the consequences would be if groundwater erodes the radioactive rock
16 April, Denys Kazanskyi,
New details of the accusations against Paul Manafort reveal the side jobs of retired European high-ranking officials
16 April, Olha Vorozhbyt,
 
 
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