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In an attempt to understand what Crimea meant and what it means for Ukraine today, to look at important moments in the history of the peninsula and Crimean Tatars, to define the foundation of Crimean Tatar identity, and to analyze the prospects of Crimea’s return to Ukraine and its position after de-occupation, The Ukrainian Week speaks to historian and political scientist Gulnara Bekirova
18 May, 2016   ▪   Anastasiya Levkova
Russia broke up in 1917, but the Bolsheviks intended to restore the empire – as a springboard to create a "Global Soviet Republic"
5 February, 2016   ▪   Stanislav Kulchytsky
When as a student I heard Arsenal, the jazz rock band of the Kaliningrad Philharmonic, I was dumbfounded: in Soviet times Russian musicians were playing music that jazz lovers at once identified as being under the influence of Chicago and Blood, Sweat and Tear
2 February, 2016   ▪   Leonіdas Donskіs
Most of the crimes against Ukrainians have been at the hands of other Ukrainians. What’s important now is to understand how this phenomenon of the Malorosians or Little Russians happened
11 January, 2016   ▪   Valeriy Prymost
When Ukraine declared independence on August 24, 1991, it not only meant the revival of the Ukrainian state—it was the decisive event in the collapse of the totalitarian soviet empire
23 September, 2015   ▪   Volodymyr Vasylenko
Ways to protect Ukrainian cultural and historical heritage in the annexed Crimea and frontline areas
23 September, 2015   ▪   Hanna Trehub
Former UPA fighter shares his story of struggle against the Nazis and NKVD, GULAGs and return to Ukraine
6 August, 2015   ▪   Volodymyr Panchenko
How Ukrainians have developed tolerance for other religions
23 July, 2015   ▪   Hanna Trehub
Empires are fated to drag along with them a cast iron wreath of invincibility and lead chains of infallibility. An empire can never lose or make a mistake, otherwise, it’s not really an empire
17 June, 2015   ▪   Valeriy Prymost
The beginning and end of World War II brought about political collusions that greatly discredited the leaders of Western democracies
12 May, 2015   ▪   Ihor Losiev
Yelyzaveta Skoropadska in art, politics and charity in some of the most tragic years of Ukrainian history
26 March, 2015   ▪  
Why is Russia so persistently aggressing on Ukraine?
27 February, 2015   ▪   Valeriy Prymost
The rationale behind transferring the peninsula to the Ukrainian SSR in 1954
5 January, 2015   ▪   Serhiy Hromenko
Russia insists that Kharkiv does not belong to Ukraine. Meanwhile, even several waves of Russification failed to make it truly Russian
23 November, 2014   ▪   Svitlana Potapenko
The image of today’s Odesa is a product of the variety of ethnic, social and professional groups you wouldn’t have seen often elsewhere in Ukraine: Ukrainian writers and Italian architects, Ukrainian chumaks, the old-time salt traders, and Jewish merchants, Ukrainian sailors and French designers, Ukrainian Cossacks and Russian officials, Ukrainian scholars and Polish revolutionaries, Ukrainian students and Greek entrepreneurs, as well as profiteers, port coachmen and policemen with no distinct ethnic origin. One thing they all had in common was freedom of spirit, ideas and actions.
18 November, 2014   ▪   Olena Bachynska
That turbulent period taught Ukrainians that the ideals of national freedom and solidarity must not be squandered on attractive slogans about social equality, “land and freedom” or “land to peasants”
26 September, 2014   ▪   Yurii Tereshchenko
International lawyer Volodymyr Vasylenko speaks about the events leading to Ukraine's independence
24 September, 2014   ▪   Bohdan Butkevych
Historian Stanislav Kulchytsky speaks to The Ukrainian Week about why the Kremlin needs Ukraine, what threat the annexation of Crimea poses for Russia, what the essence of the problem in Ukrainian-Russian relations is, and how the political Ukrainian nation is emerging
15 September, 2014   ▪   Roman Malko
Ukrainian sociopolitical movement between the mid-19th and early 20th century seemed to involve only “conscious Ukrainians”. Even then, however, forces existed which had not yet actively declared their pro-Ukrainian nature but had huge sociopolitical potential
19 August, 2014   ▪   Yurii Tereshchenko
The Russian elite now want to restore an empire, based on historical arguments at that. These kinds of arguments once gave rise to the Russian Empire and they will, once shattered, spell an end to it
9 July, 2014   ▪  
In 1918, Ukrainian conservatives tried to implement a reform agenda that was free of populism and relied on private property as the foundation of culture and civilization
1 May, 2014   ▪   Yurii Tereshchenko
The Ukrainian Navy in the Crimea has long traditions. In 1771, the Cossacks jointly with the Russian army and with the support of Zaporizhzhian Cossack boats overcame the short-lived resistance of the Turks and Tatars and conquered the peninsula. The tsarist Black Sea fleet was built primarily in the shipyards of Mykolaiv and Kherson, and many Ukrainians were its admirals, officers and seamen. In 1917-18, part of the fleet was Ukrainianized and pledged allegiance to the Central Rada.
23 March, 2014   ▪   Yaroslav Tynchenko
Federalization of Ukraine in the past: who, how, when and with what consequences
7 March, 2014   ▪   Leonid Zalizniak
The 1932-33 Holodomor was a consequence of the Bolsheviks’ efforts to completely eradicate private property
17 December, 2013   ▪  
U.S. Federal Judge Bohdan A. Futey discusses the international legal precedents that could allow Ukraine to demand recognition of the Holodomor as genocide in an international court
29 November, 2013   ▪   Hanna Trehub
Ukraine’s economic relations were originally European. So were its social lifestyle and institutions
20 November, 2013   ▪   Oleksiy Sokyrko
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Read more
Russia on Friday (Mar 22) convicted a "disabled" Ukrainian man on terrorism charges and sentenced him to six years in prison, prompting the European Union to call for his immediate release
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What measures Europe can apply to former ISIS militants
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The plenary session on Wednesday was over after consideration of amendment No. 821
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What is unique about Ukrainian migration and how it impacts national identity
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